Archer USMLE Step 3 CCS – HighYield Sample Videos

Here are samples from highly subscribed Archer USMLE Step 3 CCS strategies and high-yield CCS case protocols and demonstrations from https://ArcherReview.com . All case demonstrations during live sessions are on official USMLE exam software to give you hands-on experience with USMLE STEP 3 EXAM Software. Please realize that these strategies of diagnosis, monitoring, sequencing and timing are extremely crucial to get high performance on Step 3 CCS.

Interactive software like UWorld CCS does not teach the strategy to excel on the exam software, misses several highyield steps, does not respect the simulated time when orders are placed and therefore, is not an exact replica of your exam software. UWORLD CCS is not designed to change response based on your input unlike your Exam software. Therefore, you are left without a clue if you are optimal or unnecessarily invasive or being scored optimally for your actions.. This is one reason why several students get poor performance on their Step 3 CCS component despite practicing UWorld software several times. The following video will prove how different and responsive your EXAM software is!

Please go over above sample to see how intelligent your Exam software is and changes it’s response based on your input. In Archer CCS workshops, some important points are repeatedly applied in various case scenarios so the attendees can retain the subject better – please note these are from Live session. This video shows some case demos and few strategies. Please note that this sample does not include highly popular hundreds of Archer CCS strategies and highyield case demonstrations.

To access and subscribe to ARCHER CCS STRATEGIES AND WORKSHOPS with many more important CCS strategies, High-Yield cases, including on-demand videos of 2018 CCS workshops, please visit @ https://ArcherReview.com or @ http://www.ccsworkshop.com/Pay_Per_View.html
Available both Live and On-demand (PPV)

 

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USMLE Step 3 Question of the Week #495

495.  A 49-year-old obese female presents with abdominal pain.  Patient states the pain acutely onset several hours ago and describes it as constant, severe, localized around the umbilicus and radiating to her back.  She says the pain feels better if she is sitting up and bending slightly forward.   Patient also says she feels nauseous and vomited once after the pain began.  No relevant past medical or surgical history.  No current medications or allergies.  Review of systems is significant for several recent episodes of abdominal pain after eating.

On exam, the patient is in distress, sitting upright, and leaning slightly forward.  Vitals are temperature 38.3 °C (101.1 °F), blood pressure 110/78 mm Hg, pulse 105/min, respirations 25/min, and oxygen saturation 98% on room air.  Cardiac exam is normal.  Lungs are clear to auscultation.  Abdominal exam reveals tenderness to palpation in the periumbilical region.  Bowel sounds are diminished.

Laboratory values are:

Sodium                                                            140 mEq/L

Potassium                                                        4.0 mEqL

Chloride                                                          100 mEq/L

Bicarbonate                                                    25 mEq/L

BUN                                                                 35 mg/dL

Creatinine                                                       1.1 g mg/dL

Glucose (fasting)                                             90 mg/dL

Calcium                                                           7.0 mg/dL

Phosphorous                                                    4.1 mg/dL

Bilirubin, conjugated                                      1.5 mg/dL

Bilirubin, total                                                 3.0 mg/dL

AST (SGOT)                                                      325 mU/mL

ALT (SGPT)                                                      175 mU/mL

Alkaline Phosphatase                                      295 U/L

Amylase                                                          250 U/L

Lipase                                                              89 U/L

TSH                                                                  1.1 mIU/L

PTH                                                                  30 pg/mL

Troponin I (cTnI)                                             <0.02 ng/mL

Lactate Deydrogenase (LDH)                          750 U/L

C-reactive protein                                           45 mg/L

b-hCG                                                              <1 mIU/mL

 

WBC                                                                19,000 / mm3

RBC                                                                 4 x 106/mm3

Hematocrit                                                      45%

Hemoglobin                                                    13.0 g/dL

Platelet Count                                                 275,000 / mm3

Differential

Neutrophils (%)                                               85

Lymphocytes (%)                                             10

Monocytes (%)                                                5

Eosinophils (%)                                                3.5

Basophils (%)                                                   1.5

Chest and KUB x-rays, and EKG are unremarkable.

Aggressive fluid resuscitation and supplemental 100% oxygen are given.  Meperidine 150 mg intramuscularly is administered.  Abdominal ultrasound reveals the presence of a gallstone in the common bile duct (CBD).  Patient is kept NPO.

What is the next best step in management?


A. Contrast CT of the abdomen

B. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP)

C. Administer meropenem 1 g IV every 8 hours

D. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy

E. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP)

@hagemanGIstep2

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USMLE Step 3 Question #487

487) 57-year-old male with a history of mild COPD has been using albuterol as needed to manage his COPD without any other maintenance medications. Recently he has been experiencing a greater degree of shortness of breath, wheezing and a productive cough. Pulmonary function tests demonstrate a FEV1 that is 60% of predicted. What is the next best step for management of his COPD?

A. Add budesonide to treatment regimen

B. Add rofilumast to treatment regimen

C. Add tiotropium to treatment regimen

D. Add tiotropium plus fluticasone to treatment regimen

E. Add carbocystine to treatment regimen

 

USMLE STep 3 Question #486

A 56-year-old male with Type II diabetes presents to you today for a follow-up visit. Three months prior his A1c was 8.9% and he was started on metformin. Today his A1c is 7.4%. He is significantly overweight with a BMI of 33. You would like to initiate another medication for glucose control, specifically one that does not carry a risk of weight gain. Which of the following drugs is weight neutral?

  • A.  Glimepride
  • B. Rosiglitazone
  • C.  Pioglitazone
  • D. Sitagliptin
  • E. Glyburide

Question of the Week #485

485. A 10-year-old female presents with a 3 week history of cough.  Initially she had a runny nose and was tired with a slight cough but as the runny nose resolved the cough seemed to get worse.  She states that the cough is dry sounding and occurs during the day and night.  She describes having coughing spasms that occasionally end in vomiting but between episodes of coughing she is fine.  Her mom reports that during a coughing spasm she will gasp for air and sometimes make a “whooping” noise.  A nasopharyngeal swab confirms a diagnosis of Bordatella pertussis.  Which of the following is true?

A. Her 3-month-old brother should be treated with azithromycin as prophylaxis

B. She should be started on azithromycin for more rapid resolution of cough.

C. Her classmates should be treated with clarithromycin as prophylaxis

D. She will have lifelong natural immunity against Bordatella pertussis.

E. Her classmates should receive a Tdap booster regardless of their vaccination status

Question of the Week #483

BACKGROUND:

Beta-blockers reduce mortality in patients who have chronic heart failure, systolic dysfunction, and are on background treatment with diuretics and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. We aimed to compare the effects of carvedilol and metoprolol on clinical outcome.

METHODS:

In a multicenter, double blind, and randomized parallel group trial, we assigned 1511 patients with chronic heart failure to treatment with carvedilol (target dose 25 mg twice daily) and 1518 to metoprolol (metoprolol tartrate, target dose 50 mg twice daily). Patients were required to have chronic heart failure (NYHA II-IV), previous admission for a cardiovascular reason, an ejection fraction of less than 0.35, and to have been treated optimally with diuretics and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors unless not tolerated. The primary endpoints were all-cause mortality and the composite endpoint of all-cause mortality or all-cause admission. Analysis was done by intention to treat.

FINDINGS:

The mean study duration was 58 months (SD 6). The mean ejection fraction was 0.26 (0.07) and the mean age 62 years (11). The all-cause mortality was 34% (512 of 1511) for carvedilol and 40% (600 of 1518) for metoprolol (hazard ratio 0.83 [95% CI 0.74-0.93], p=0.0017). The reduction of all-cause mortality was consistent across predefined subgroups. Incidence of side effects and drug withdrawals did not differ by much between the two study groups.

 

  1. To which of the following patients are the results of this clinical trial applicable?
    1. A 62-year-old male with primarily diastolic congestive heart failure.
    2. A 75-year-old female with systolic dysfunction and an EF of 45%.
    3. A 56-year-old male with NYHA class I systolic heart failure.
    4. A newly diagnosed 66-year-old male who has yet to begin treatment for his NYHA class II systolic heart failure.
    5. A 68-year-old male with NYHA class II systolic heart failure and EF 30%.

 

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